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10-K
RLJ LODGING TRUST filed this Form 10-K on 03/01/2019
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We would incur adverse tax consequences if FelCor failed to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes prior to our merger with FelCor.

In connection with the closing of the merger with FelCor on the Acquisition Date, FelCor received an opinion of counsel to the effect that it qualified as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes under the Code through the Acquisition Date. FelCor, however, did not request a ruling from the IRS that it qualified as a REIT. If, notwithstanding this opinion, FelCor’s REIT status prior to the Acquisition Date were successfully challenged, we would face serious tax consequences that would substantially reduce our core funds from operations, and cash available for distribution, including cash available to pay dividends to our shareholders, because:
FelCor, would be subject to U.S. federal, state and local income tax on its net income at regular corporate rates for the years that it did not qualify as a REIT (and, for such years, would not be allowed a deduction for dividends paid to shareholders in computing its taxable income) and we would succeed to the liability for such taxes;
the deemed sale of assets by FelCor on the Acquisition Date would be subject to U.S. federal, state and local income tax at regular corporate rates (and FelCor would not be allowed a deduction for dividends paid for the deemed liquidating distribution paid to its shareholders) and we would succeed to the liability for such taxes; and
we would succeed to any earnings and profits accumulated by FelCor, as applicable, for the tax periods that FelCor did not qualify as a REIT and we would have to pay a special dividend and/or employ applicable deficiency dividend procedures (including interest payments to the IRS) to eliminate such earnings and profits to maintain our REIT qualification.
As a result of these factors, FelCor’s failure to qualify as a REIT prior to the Acquisition Date could impair our ability to expand our business and raise capital and could materially adversely affect the value of our stock.  In addition, even if FelCor qualified as a REIT for the duration of its existence, if there is an adjustment to FelCor’s taxable income or dividends-paid deductions, we could be required to elect to use the deficiency dividend procedure to maintain FelCor’s REIT status. That deficiency dividend procedure could require us to make significant distributions to our shareholders and pay significant interest to the IRS.

Risks Related to Our Common Shares

Our cash available for distribution to shareholders may not be sufficient to pay distributions at expected or required levels, and we may need to borrow funds or rely on other external sources in order to make such distributions, or we may not be able to make such distributions at all, which could cause the market price of our common shares to decline significantly.

We intend to continue to pay regular quarterly distributions to holders of our common shares. All distributions will be made at the discretion of our board of trustees and will depend on our historical and projected results of operations, EBITDA, FFO, liquidity and financial condition, REIT qualification, debt service requirements, capital expenditures and operating expenses, prohibitions and other restrictions under financing arrangements and applicable law and other factors as our board of trustees may deem relevant from time to time. No assurance can be given that our projections will prove to be accurate or that any level of distributions or particular yield will be made or sustained. We may not be able to make distributions in the future or we may need to fund such distributions through borrowings or other external financing sources, which may be available only at unattractive terms, if at all. Any of the foregoing could cause the market price of our common shares to decline significantly.

To the extent that our distributions represent a return of capital for tax purposes, you could recognize an increased capital gain upon a subsequent sale of your stock.
 
Distributions in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits and not treated by us as a dividend will not be taxable to a U.S. stockholder to the extent such distributions do not exceed the stockholder’s adjusted tax basis in its shares of our stock but instead will constitute a return of capital and will reduce the stockholder’s adjusted tax basis in its share of our stock. If our distributions result in a reduction of a stockholder’s adjusted basis in its shares of our stock, subsequent sales by such stockholder of its shares of our stock could potentially result in recognition of an increased capital gain or reduced capital loss due to the reduction in such stockholder’s adjusted basis in its shares of our stock.
 

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